Versioning: GitLab 15.2 makes it easier to document incidents

Versioning: GitLab 15.2 makes it easier to document incidents

The July update GitLab 15.2 has been released on time. There are over 40 changes in the version control platform this month. Live preview diagrams in the Wiki WYSIWYG editor as well as editable timelines for incidents are available for users of all editions. GitLab Ultimate users can also apply policies to all groups and subgroups of a project.

GitLab provides the option of using a wiki for each project. A live preview has found its way into the wiki WYSIWYG editor in version 15.2. It displays diagrams in real-time as soon as a user writes a diagram in a specialized block of code.

The editor recognizes the type of diagram and displays a corresponding preview icon. If live preview is enabled, the diagram is rendered over the code block. It updates itself as the code is entered, so that it can be checked directly for correctness.

GitLab 15.2 brings a live preview for diagrams in the wiki WYSIWG editor.

(Image: GitLab)

To enable an incident to be recorded chronologically, GitLab provides the new Incident Timeline feature. According to GitLab, documenting an incident is an important step that opens up room for learning opportunities. Incident Timeline can be used both during and after an incident to manually add or delete events related to the incident. The timeline can be viewed in a separate tab, the entries of which are listed in descending order by date and time as well as sorted by date.

A new incident timeline provides an overview of the history of incidents.

A new incident timeline provides an overview of the history of incidents.

(Image: GitLab)

Unlike editions hosted on GitLab.com, the feature is not active on self-managed GitLab by default. This requires activating the feature flag incident_timeline required by an admin. To create a timeline, users must have at least the Developer role in a project. Further details on creating an incident timeline can be found in the documentation.

Other innovations in Gitlab 15.2 include the option of uniformly applying policies to groups and subgroups of a project. The feature is reserved for users of GitLab Ultimate and should be particularly suitable for large companies with a large number of projects. The feature currently only relates to scan execution guidelines, which, for example, ensure that security scans are carried out according to a defined rhythm. In the future, GitLab plans to extend the new feature to scan result policies.

All further details about GitLab 15.2 can be found in the blog entry for the announcement.

(May)

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